More whipping on Lending Tree, more ads on Scrabulous

Played Scrabulous today on Facebook for the first time.

Through 4pm today, I’ve been served 20 Lending Tree ads.

A few problems:

– I don’t own a home
– I don’t need to refinance a home
– I’m playing a game
– There is no frequency cap

And I traced the ad back to advertising.com’s leadback program. I visited Lending Tree earlier this week and did not take an action on their site.

How is this relevant?
How am I in market?

And Yahoo couldn’t blow away their numbers. Amazing….

Update (4:45): I am now up to 25 ads vs. my cookie…industry standard is 6 per consumer per day.

Random: They should add supporting marketing material to the Scrabulous brand logo that reads, “Where smart people go for online dating?”

Update: (5:15): I’m up to 35 Lending Tree ads with absolutely zero shot for a conversion. I wonder if they have an age filter in there. Cubix or Social Media, but be making a killing. Simplyamazing. As a note, right after that date comment I got a Trojan ad (that’s contextual, perfect)

Final Update: As of 10pm last evening, I had been served 61 LendingTree ads, at which point I became inmarket for EDU ads and UofP through advertising.com leadback. I guess there was a time-of-day ruleset.

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3 comments so far

  1. John DeMayo on

    Believe it or not, given the other options, it may have been the right choice to serve you that ad 35 times. Behavioral data is weighted heavily for a reason. And the option set outside of this may be pretty poor.

  2. saveproduction on

    Going to disagree with you John though I understand your rationale.

    I imagine there is some negative brand equity to saturating the consumer. Further, if a network or agency is managing to a CTR rate here, they might cut off other campaigns that are more legitimate, but don’t have as much volume.

    I certainly see your point however.

  3. Fredo on

    It’s leadback, which is a gutter product. Once your cookied, they’ll serve inventory as agressively as possible to claim credit for a conversion. close to 90% of users, who ‘convert’ don’t see the last ad / lead back, which proves that this way of measuring CPA is rediculous….


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